Animal Care Guides

Many people have good intentions about animal ownership but sometimes they go wrong by being uneducated about what their animals truly require. Search these guides below to find out how to take care of your animals and pets. Having the correct knowledge of an animal’s living requirements to thrive, stay healthy and of course be happy is an important first step to pet ownership and animal husbandry.

Being able to digest this information and translate it into action is paramount however. If for any reason you can not provide the right home for an animal, you should not keep it. Just like a child in the family, a household pet is dependent on you for almost everything. It’s very easy to fall in love with your pets and consider them a part of the family but it is no excuse to maintain ownership if you can not properly house, sufficiently feed or provide routine health checkups for them.

Not to worry though, a good majority of people that do decide to take on animal ownership have the ability to fulfill their animal’s needs. And since you landed on this page, it is apparent you obviously care enough to know what your pets must have to be happy. Follow the information in these guides and ask questions when you have them and you will do just fine.

Puppies

husky puppy

Being prepared before taking home a puppy is the ideal way to make getting a new companion easy….

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Goldfish

fantail-goldfish

The iconic image of the bubble shaped goldfish bowl has led to many of new pet goldfish to live very short lives…

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Chickens

Backyard Urban Chicken

Since if you get chickens as chicks from mail order or farm supply outlets you may end up with male chickens, adoption is better…..

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Hamsters

small-hamster

Syrian hamsters shouldn’t be housed together as they are territorial creatures, but. it’s okay to keep dwarf breeds in the same cage…

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Hedgehogs

Little Hedgehog

Personality matters with hedgehogs. Keep this in mind when you purchase one, as they maybe a bit prickly at first when adapting to a new environment…

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Ducks

duck

Getting a duck or duckling as a pet should only be considered as an option if the proper environment can be provided to ensure a happy duck…

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Kittens

Kitty Cat

Make the kitten feel more comfortable by not making many changes in its environment…..

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Rabbits

Mother Rabbit

For a single rabbit, even a small dwarf breed, its cage or hutch needs to be a minimum of 4’L x 2’W x 18″H (61cm x 122cm x 46cm)…

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Turtles

Box turtle on white

There’s a variety of pet turtle species available and each have unique needs. Some are vegetarians while other are carnivores…

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Frogs

pet-frog

When selecting your new pet frog, consider the amount of care it will require and its unique habitat it needs to thrive….

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Chinchillas

Silver Chinchilla

The cages that are usually sold in pet shops as ‘chinchilla cages’ are often too small for a grown chinchilla to move….

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Coming Soon

  • Farm and Barnyard Animals
  • Rodents and Other Small Animals
  • Aquarium Fish and Creatures
  • Birds and Parrots
  • Snakes and Lizards
  • Other Amphibians
  • Arachnids and Creepy Crawlers

7 comments on “Animal Care Guides

  1. For older adults interested in adopting a senior dog or cat, there are programs available that can subsidize pet adoption fees and the animal’s medical care. See Resources section below.

  2. I am sorry☹about what happened with both of your hamsters you should never have two hamsters together only1hamster you should get a new hamster olny1 hamster and tell me if you a new hamster😄

  3. Hi, we got a teddy bear hamster about three weeks ago. Hes been fine til a couple days ago we noticed some brownish liquid on one corner. I thought it was pee as he peed the same color on me that night we bought him at the pet shop. I cleaned it up and this morning saw the same thing. Hes been fine and active, sleeping all day and exercising all night so I wasnt worried. This afternoon, we bought a female hamster and put her in his cage. At first it was funny as our male wouldnt leave our female alone. I think he was trying to mate with her. But she was so busy exploring the cage she started to bite him a few minutes later. They then started fighting and the female would keep running away. We left them and went to cook some lunch. When I peeked in a few minutes later, I noticed red liquid in one of the houses they were previously fighting in. It sucks because I dont know who it came from. What might have happened? We would really appreciate all the info we can get. Pls help 🙁

    • If you keep two Syrian hamsters in the same cage, fighting is commonplace. Dwarf hamsters on the other hand can live together – but not always. They too can fight. If you have Syrian hamsters, you should get two cages. If they are dwarfs, continue to monitor them and if the fighting continues, you will need to separate them as well.

    • You should not have two hamsters together also if there is blood that is not good i am sorry☹about what happened you should get a new😄hamster only won hamster ok.

  4. With over 140 years of expertise at your fingertips, there’s always something new to learn about your pooch.

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